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Ruptured Baker's cyst

Published:January 23, 2023DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjms.2023.01.006
      An 87-year-old woman presented to the outpatient clinic with acute onset of swelling and pain in her left lower leg. She had no recent episodes of trauma. Her vital signs were normal. Physical examination showed a swollen left lower leg without signs of inflammation and with ecchymosis around the medial malleolus (Figure 1A, arrows). Blood tests revealed normal C-reactive protein but elevated d-dimer (4.1 µg/mL). Ultrasonography and contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed subcutaneous edema with fluid collection in the intermuscular spaces without any findings of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) (Figure 1B, arrowheads). Given the history, physical findings, and imaging results, we made a diagnosis of ruptured Baker's cyst. The symptoms had disappeared after 14 days of rest and leg elevation.
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