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Anosmia caused by brain tumor

  • Lok-Yee Joyce Li
    Affiliations
    Department of Anatomical Pathology, Far Eastern Memorial Hospital, New Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Medicine, Shin Kong Wu-Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Otolaryngology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Lin Chien-Yi
    Affiliations
    Department of Pediatrics, Shin Kong Wu-Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan
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  • Cheng-Yu Tsai
    Affiliations
    Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Imperial College London, London, England
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  • Cheng-Jung Wu
    Correspondence
    Corresponding author.
    Affiliations
    Department of Otolaryngology, School of Medicine, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Department of Otolaryngology, Shuang Ho Hospital, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, Taiwan

    Ph.D. Degree Program of Biomedical Science and Engineering, National Yang Ming Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan
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Published:August 26, 2022DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.amjms.2022.08.014
      A 67-year-old health woman presented with a 2-year history of anosmia. The patient went to otolaryngologic clinics for help. Sinuscopic examination of nasal cavity showed no signs of upper respiratory infections, allergic rhinitis, chronic rhinitis, polyps, sinusitis, and nasopharyngeal carcinomas. Nasal airway resistance, evaluated by rhinomanometry, was within normal ranges. Olfactory test revealed total loss of smell. She also denied history of trauma, smoking and overdose of decongestants. Computed tomography of the head showed a huge brain tumor at anterior skull base. Prompt neurosurgery referral was arranged. T1-weighted axial magnetic resonance imaging (with gadolinium) showed a large extra-axial well-enhanced mass lesion measured about 5.9 cm by 5.2 cm along midline of anterior skull base (Figure A), with abutting cribriform plate on coronal and sagittal view (arrow in Figure B and Figure C).
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