Advertisement

Powassan virus encephalitis: Single center experience from capital district of New York

      Powassan virus is a subtype of the flavivirus group that is transmitted by the ixodid tick from various wild animal reservoirs such as white-footed mouse, red squirrel, and groundhog.
      • Hermance ME
      • Thangamani S
      Powassan Virus: an emerging arbovirus of public health concern in North America.
      ,
      • El Khoury MY
      • Camargo JF
      • White JL
      • et al.
      Potential role of deer tick virus in Powassan encephalitis cases in Lyme disease-endemic areas of New York, U.S.A.
      It is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus with two recognized lineages: POWV (Lineage I) and Deer Tick Virus DTV (Lineage II). Both Lineages are phylogenetically distinct, however their clinical course is indistinguishable.
      • Hermance ME
      • Thangamani S
      Powassan Virus: an emerging arbovirus of public health concern in North America.
      ,
      • Krow-Lucal ER
      • Lindsey NP
      • Fischer M
      • et al.
      Powassan Virus disease in the United States, 2006–2016.
      POWV and DTV depend on Ixodid tick for their natural transmission with I. Cookie being the primary tick for POWV and I. scapularis for DTV.
      • Hermance ME
      • Thangamani S
      Powassan Virus: an emerging arbovirus of public health concern in North America.
      ,
      • Krow-Lucal ER
      • Lindsey NP
      • Fischer M
      • et al.
      Powassan Virus disease in the United States, 2006–2016.
      Geographic distribution of both lineages I and II (POWV and DTV) overlaps in the northeastern regions of the United States, with more data needed to map its distribution in Midwestern states.
      • Krow-Lucal ER
      • Lindsey NP
      • Fischer M
      • et al.
      Powassan Virus disease in the United States, 2006–2016.
      To read this article in full you will need to make a payment

      Purchase one-time access:

      Academic & Personal: 24 hour online accessCorporate R&D Professionals: 24 hour online access
      One-time access price info
      • For academic or personal research use, select 'Academic and Personal'
      • For corporate R&D use, select 'Corporate R&D Professionals'

      Subscribe:

      Subscribe to The American Journal of the Medical Sciences
      Already a print subscriber? Claim online access
      Already an online subscriber? Sign in
      Institutional Access: Sign in to ScienceDirect

      References

        • Hermance ME
        • Thangamani S
        Powassan Virus: an emerging arbovirus of public health concern in North America.
        Vector-Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2017; 17: 453-462
        • El Khoury MY
        • Camargo JF
        • White JL
        • et al.
        Potential role of deer tick virus in Powassan encephalitis cases in Lyme disease-endemic areas of New York, U.S.A.
        Emerg Infect Dis. 2013; 19: 1926-1933
        • Krow-Lucal ER
        • Lindsey NP
        • Fischer M
        • et al.
        Powassan Virus disease in the United States, 2006–2016.
        Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2018; 18: 286-290
      1. CDC, Powassan Virus. 2019.

        • Wong SJ
        • Demarest VL
        • Boyle RH
        • et al.
        Detection of human anti-flavivirus antibodies with a west nile virus recombinant antigen microsphere immunoassay.
        J Clin Microbiol. 2004; 42: 65-72
        • Litzba N
        • Zelená H
        • Kreil TR
        • et al.
        Evaluation of different serological diagnostic methods for tick-borne encephalitis virus: enzyme-linked immunosorbent, immunofluorescence, and neutralization assay.
        Vector Borne Zoonotic Dis. 2014; 14: 149-159
        • Haines B.
        Do ticks die in the winter? Habits, Temperatures, Avoidance.
        GudGear Website.2021 (Available at:)
        • Piantadosi A
        • Rubin DB
        • McQuillen DP
        • et al.
        Emerging cases of Powassan Virus Encephalitis in New England: clinical presentation, imaging, and review of the literature.
        Clin Infect Dis. 2016; 62: 707-713
        • Raval M
        • Singhal M
        • Guerrero D
        Powassan virus infection: case series and literature review from a single institution.
        BMC Res Notes. 2012; 5: 594
        • Johnson DK
        • Staples JE
        • Sotir MJ
        • et al.
        Tickborne Powassan virus infections among Wisconsin residents.
        WMJ. 2010; 109: 91-97